Hockey Drills – Iron Cross, Defense Transitions, Quick Skating, Tight Turns & Lateral Movement Drill

30030

Iron Cross Drill Hockey

This is a great  drill for the days you work on penalty killing.  Not only is this a conditioning drill, but it is a drill that focuses on one of the best habits, Stopping and Starting.  The stopping and starting habit is critical to having a great penalty kill.  In this drill the players are always facing forwards.  The skater skates to the center dot, stop, and side step while facing forwards to the outside hash or dot, stop, side step back to the center dot, stop, skates to the opposite dot or harsh mark, stops, then skates forward and out of the circle to complete the drill.

Tips

  • Keep shoulders square
  • Head stays up
  • Always facing forwards

Lateral movement

The importance of defensive lateral movement. Last week we focused on the importance of proper arm swing when skating and also the ability to perform tight turns, when trying to escape an opponent. This session will address drills that cansubstantially improve your agility on the ice, which will make you a more dangerous player.
<p>
The game of hockey have evolved over the past several years, as no longer to wingers go up and down the ice in a straight line. Also players who wish long and wide looping turns, will be left behind in today’s modern game.
<p>
Transitions
<p>
Being able to transition from forward to backwards, use to be a skill that was aimed more at defensemen than forwards. But with game having moved to a more multi-directional one, forwards who cannot perform def lateral movements, will not survive in the competitive game of hockey.
<p>
Once again the word edges is a huge component of this skill and it requires mastering your outside edge, as there are so many cross unders in this ma. Transitioning will allow you to always be facing your teammates and thus give you several options in both the off and defensive zones.
<p>
The beauty of this drill is that you can break your team or group into five areas, by using all the face off circles on the ice. You will require 5 pylons or pucks with one in the middle of the circle and the other four spread out in a clock format, at 12-3-6 and 9!
<p>
The first drill will require that a player stand in middle of circle, next to the pylon. His drill will require that he perform quick turn around one pylon, return to the middle and go around and then on to the next pylon, until he has complete all four.
<p>
Do this without a puck and then progress to drill with a puck.
<p>
This drill will also be done backwards first without a puck and then will puck.
<p>
The final segment to this drill will be forwards from the middle to the first pylon and then transition backwards to the middle pylon, forwards to the second pylon and backwards to the middle.
<p>
This can become very competitive by using a stopwatch to time each player and have as part of a skill competition. Another outstanding drill which again can take advantage of the face off circles is forcing the player to go around the circle, with his eyes always facing in the same direction. This will force the player to do forwards crossovers half way around the circle, but then require them to transition backwards for the second half. You can do this first without a puck and then with a puck.
<p>
What is the purpose of this drill?
<p>
It develops an average player to a dangerous player. One who can handle the puck not only forwards, but also in a situation that requires them to skate backwards away for the opponent.
<p>
Please remember that by making yourself a more versatile player, you become a huge asset to your coach and team. By being an exceptional transitional player, you give your coach the option to play you as a forward, penalty killer, power play and even a defensemen, if injuries reduce your healthy available defensemen!
<p>
Next week we are going to demonstrated several puck handling drills, that will set you up for success.

Beach Sports Academy

Comments

Category Tag


Published on Nov 21, 2011 by Chris